Should We Change the Lord’s Prayer?

Many news outlets have reported that Pope Francis wants to change the translation of the Lord’s Prayer.  Specifically, he objects that “lead us not into temptation” (Matt. 6:13) makes it seem like the Lord leads us to sin. 

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/12/07/pope-francis-wants-to-change-line-our-father-prayer.html

With all due respect, I strongly believe he is wrong.  The pope said, “That is not a good translation.”  Actually, it is an excellent translation as you’ll see in this article.  Continue reading

Don’t Eat That

God created all things, so He makes the rules.  God gave Adam the responsibility for the whole garden.  Adam could eat whatever he liked, except for one thing. 

And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: 17 But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. (Gen. 2:16-17)

Sometimes, God’s restrictions don’t make sense to us.  As a matter of fact, we’re not sure why God gave this restriction.  However, God does not have to explain Himself.  After all, He’s God! Continue reading

Work Is Good

We often get the idea that work is a bad thing.  However, God didn’t create work to be that way.  In the Garden of Eden, Adam had work responsibilities.

And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it. (Gen. 2:15)

Notice first that God put Adam in the garden.  God was the One Who created work.  As we saw in the previous verses, God made everything good, so work must be good.  In Genesis 3, work became difficult due to sin, but work itself was created by God to be good for mankind.  God made human beings to be productive.
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The Rivers of Eden

Water is necessary for life.  So for a vibrant garden to flourish, plenty of water was needed.  A single river (unnamed) went out of Eden to provide water for the plant and animal life there. 

And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. 11 The name of the first is Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold; 12 And the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone. 13 And the name of the second river is Gihon: the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Ethiopia. 14 And the name of the third river is Hiddekel: that is it which goeth toward the east of Assyria. And the fourth river is Euphrates. (Gen. 2:10-14)

This river split into four rivers, which went out to a larger land area.  There are names given to these rivers: Pison, Gihon, Hiddekel, and Euphrates.  Modern Bible teachers and scholars have tried to identify these with rivers seen today to try and locate the area of Garden of Eden.  Pison has had several suggested identities, but in general, it is believed to be a now dry riverbed stretching across the Arabian Peninsula.  Gihon is considered to be another name for the Nile.  Hiddekel is associated with the Tigris River and the Euphrates River is well-known.  There is only one problem with this–these rivers do not come together at any point.  While it is possible that at one point they did, there is a better explanation for this: the Flood of Noah. Continue reading